Archives For upholstered ottoman

Living It Up

Jennifer —  May 10, 2013 — Leave a comment

Five Years Ago we loved into our house and this is what the living room looked like:

iloverhehabs.com

I loved the large bay windows and how the room was open to the kitchen. Last Wednesday I shared you the Google Image of our house before we bought it.  It had a massive tree in front.  You can see a winterized version of the tree here.

Living Room

This was how the room looked for a little while.

Living Room

Our living room was the last on the lis to rehab.  Mostly because I just couldn’t decide how I wanted it to look.  Here is the transitional stage.  (Sorry for the bad picture)

Living Room transition

The fireplace was what was throwing me off.  It was very red and I don’t love the color red as the main focal point in the room.  I do love read accents but this red was defining this room. It took a little patience to get Lee on board with painting the fireplace but when I finally did, the room just came together naturally.

Living Room Final

We built the bookcases to flank each side of the fireplace and I covered the Ikea Lack floating shelves with fabric. I was nervous to do it, but I am so thankful I painted the fireplace, and Lee is too.  We use it every winter so painting it did hinder its purpose.  I never could decide what to put on the mantle.  I tried different things but everything I could find was too big or too small.  To be honest, I kind of liked the minimal look.

Living Room Final 2

This is my favorite little nook with my rock star chair that I found on Craigslist for $50.    I read my bible here every morning.  I blog here.  Its my favorite spot.

Living Room Final 3

Here is an up close shot. I made the bible poster and the book cover art here.  I also have a stack of all my favorite design books.

Living Room Final4

The other side has our television and all of our electronics.  We don’t have cable but we do have an antenna.  See how we installed that here.  Read here and here on how we watch television without cable.  I also found this chair on the side of the road and recovered it.  This chair is my husband’s favorite chair.  He usually pulls this back to the couch and watches t.v. in this chair.

Living Room Final 5

Here is the view of the living room from the kitchen.  I bought a carpet remnant and cut it to fit the room perfectly.

Living Room Final 6

I built this ottoman/coffee table from an Ikea Lack Coffee table.

Living Room Final 7

I made a tray from an old cabinet door and it is the perfect place for coffee and drinks.  That is Lee’s car that he made to race when he was little.  Are you impressed?  I am.

Living Room Final 8

I needed extra seating but I did not want to block the window.  We bought a love seat originally but I returned it.  The hubs built me a bench and I made a cushion.  Its extra cushy and I love laying on this bench and taking a nap.  The bench is as big and as deep as a love seat.

Living Room Final 9

I also made these curtains out of fabric scraps I had on hand.  They are all different weights of fabric.  The trick was to make sure the heaviest weighted fabric was at the top and bottom.  I had to calculate my stripes based on how much I had while still making the two panels identical.  I didn’t have enough blue and white for the curtains to be long enough…so I added black.  Random, but I love them.

Living Room Final 10

Here is the view of the room from the fireplace.  You can see how our hallway goes back to our bedrooms.  I found my couch at a local store called Brashears.  Around here, leather and tan couches are king so I was thankful to find a grey couch with modern lines.  The pillows are from target and Ikea.

Living Room 11

In this picture you can see how the living room flows into the kitchen.  I love how open and cozy it all is.

Living Room Final 12

If you have followed this blog long you know I have a love for all things Danish Modern.  I had no intention of getting a new entry way dresser until I found this dresser for $50.  I made the chalk board quote wall out of framed drywall.

Living Room Final 13

I style this area often, but this is how it has been for a while.  I found the F sign for $1 at a flea market, I love vintage books and the jar is full of the Christmas cards we received this year.  I like to pull one out every once in a while and pray for that family.

Living Room Final 14

Speaking of drywall, I used fabric covered pieces of clearance drywall and ikea frames to create this gallery wall.  You can see here what all the art is on the wall.

Living Room 15

The frames go all the way into the hallway.  I love how it turned out and I ofter catch my self looking at them all and smiling.

Living Room 16

Its been a progress and I have loved this room, especially on a cold winter night with a fire.  It looks much different today because we have started packing it all up.  I wish I could put it all back.

Have a Great Weekend,

Jennifer

Hack the Lack Part 2

Jennifer —  March 19, 2012 — Leave a comment

This is part 2 of a two-part series.  If you haven’t checked out part 1 you might be a little lost.  The good news is that you can check it out here.

A few weeks ago I posted part one of my Lack Coffee Table Overhaul.  Here is how I did it and here is a picture of where I left off:

 I left the ottoman this way for a couple of weeks. The next step was to purchase a piece of nice plywood to cut for the bottom shelf so that it could sit on the metal rungs that formerly held the old bottom shelf.

The problem is that the nice plywood (the smooth and thick kind that won’t bend in the middle) is 26-36 dollars.  I know I am super cheap but that price is for a large 4X8 ft peace and I don’t need that much.  I am basically paying that much for half of the piece of wood.  Yes, I know I am cheap and yes, I could probably use the extra for another project but I don’t have one in mind.   It would end up cluttering the garage and it would probably be there for a while.  That is why I left the ottoman at part 1.  It was serving its purpose well.  Then, last week the Hubs brought home this:

The Hubs works for a contracting company here in town and these were the extra trim pieces for custom kitchen cabinets from a remodel.  The cabinetry company didn’t want them and they were headed to the dumpster.  The hubs swooped in and saved them.  He had no idea how I would use them but he knew that I would.  Isn’t he great?  The only way to make these work was to build  a slatted shelf.  I hesitated because that seemed rustic to me.  I love me some rustic, and rustic modern speaks my language, but its not the vibe of my current living room.   In the name of “free” I  figured that since its mostly covered by the top and would be filled with stuff, you wouldn’t even notice.    I could modernize it a little with paint.

Here is how I did it:

  1. I made a rectangle base.  I attached it using wood glue and flat brackets.  One of these days I am going to break down and get a Kreg  jig.
  2. I cut the slats to size.
  3. I primed and painted each slat.  I did this because I knew there would be a tiny 1/64 inch space between each slat.  This would make it impossible to paint, yet I anticipated that you could see the unfinished wood.   To avoid this, I had to paint the slats before I constructed it.
  4. Using a brad nailer, I attached the slats.
  5. I flipped the shelf over and used a chisel to chisel out a place for the metal rungs to rest.  This is how the shelf stays on without sliding off.  Before I moved on, I checked to see if it worked and it did!
  6. Using Durham’s Water Putty I filled the holes on the top and sides.
  7. I used 60 grit paper to sand the entire thing and then finished it off with 150 grit paper.
  8. I primed 2 coats
  9. I painted 2 coats.  I used Glidden Parchment White.  Thankfully, younghouselove had to match Ikea’s white for one of their projects and they had done the research of what matched Ikea white.  It worked for them and it worked for me.
  10. I laid the wood shelf on the rungs and here it is!

Now this busy side table is clutter free again…

Because all the stuff went here:

I am not done, I need to get a basket for remotes and playing cards.  Yep, we play cards here.

Just A Fun Reminder of the Before:

To This:

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Living Room Final 6

Total Cost of the Ottoman:

  • 2 yards of fabric – FM fabrics (3.99 a yard) – I used a gift card ($0)
  • Two packs flat brackets – Lowes – $3.50 total
  • Lack Coffee Table – $19.00.  I had this coffee table so free for the overhaul.
  • Slats for shelf – leftover construction wood – Free
  • Primer – HAd it leftover from my bookcases.
  • 1 quart Glidden Parchment White (semi-Gloss) - Home Depot – $12.00
  • Wood Glue – Had it
  • Brad Nails – Had it
  • Hammer and Chisel – Had it
  • Batting:  Had it leftover from another project
  • Foam – Two Target twin-sized foam mattress topper, On sale for $9.99 a pop – $20.00
  • Grey underside fabric – Free- It was leftover from my guest bedroom headboard
  • wood for the top and braces underneath - Free – Had it in the woodpile
  • wood for the side edging – 2 1X2 from Lowes – $4.00
  • Buttons – Wal-Mart – 5 boxes – $10.00
  • Hot glue, staples, staple gun, fishing twine, upholstery needle – Had it

Total Cost: $50.00

Since all I used was the Lack Table’s legs, you don’t have a lack coffee table you could do the entire process and purchase legs at Lowes, or chop the legs off of an old table and install them like I did this bench. For the metal rugs you could use of those reversible screws like this one.  You would prep the shelf and lay it just as I did.

Is everyone having a great monday?  See ya tomorrow for more Rehab Life!

Thanks for reading,

Jennifer

If you liked this post you might like these:

Hack the Lack Part 1

Hack The Lack Part 1

Jennifer —  March 5, 2012 — 6 Comments

As I was putting the pieces together in my living room I started to notice that my Lack Coffee table was serving a great purpose but it didn’t look proportionally right.  I also longed to have a comfy place to prop up my feet when I watch t.v.  So, I decided to hack the lack.  I figured I could use the legs and the mounting hardware.  I wouldn’t use the top or bottom shelf in this project, but I figured I could find something around the house for those things.  Here is how I changed this:

To This:  (p.s. – I haven’t finished yet, I still have to put on the bottom)

1.)  I took a piece of plywood I had in my garage and cut it to the dimensions that I wanted.

2.)  I purchased some 1X2 at Lowes for $1.67 a pop and used it to border the edge of the plywood.  I did this to reinforce the plywood but also to make an upholstered edge so it would look more polished

3.)  I added some 1X3 we had leftover from a recent outdoor project.  These also gave more reinforcement to the sturdy 3/4 inch plywood.  Since it was so big I decided to make it a little more sturdy. ( I added one in the middle too but its not pictured here.  You will see it a few pics down)

4.)  I measured the plywood and found the center.  From these measurements, I figured out where I wanted the buttons.  I didn’t get a picture of this but I did in the same way I did my headboard.

5.)  I made marks and drilled holes for the buttons.  I used a 1/2 inch spade drill bit.

6.)  I didn’t like my button placement so I changed it up and had to drill more holes.  The new pattern used some of the previously drilled holes so to help my while I tufted, I covered up the holes that were not supposed to be used with some duck tape. (do you like by OU duck tape?)

7.)  Next, I attached the foam to the top of the plywood.  I used two twin sized foam mattress toppers from Target.  In my store they were $9.99 a pop.  Maybe they were on sale because they are $14.99 online.  I also used  a $5.00 coupon. The total came to about $15.00.   To make a smooth top to your ottoman place the patterned side down.  I attached them with some liquid nails.  I know that might be a little much.  I am sure that spray adhesive will work but I didn’t have any.  I had some liquid nails so that is what I used. A little trick for you:  I chose the width of my ottoman to be the same width as the foam.  That meant I didn’t have to cut up the foam that much…just wack off the end, with an electric turkey carver of course. Whoever got me that electric knife over 6 years ago for a wedding gift probably had no idea I would use it more for DIY projects than Thanksgiving day turkey carving.

8.)  I covered the side edges with some thick batting I had leftover from this slipcover project.  There is always a reason I keep scraps.

9.)  Next, I covered the entire thing with quilt batting and stapled it on the underside.

10.) Using scissors, I punctured holes through the batting and foam where the buttons would go. I just opened the scissors and stuck on end through the hole on the bottom.  I twisted to form a hole. This is where the duck tape came in handy. It kept me from punching the wrong holes in the foam. The foam covered my the holes that I didn’t use really well.

11.) I  washed and ironed my fabric  I purchased the same fabric that I used to make these new living room curtains.  I used scraps to make the curtains and I was a little nervous my favorite fabric store wouldn’t have it anymore but after some digging I found it.  I purchased 2 yards a $3.99 a pop.  Yeah Clearance aisle!  (which those of you who know this store know that I had to work for that 3.99 a yard fabric.  They just have bolts and bolts on top of each other in the clearance aisle.  I was sweating moving them all around.

12.)  The next step was to make my buttons.  To do this, I purchased 5 button kits at Wal-mart.  I needed 18 buttons so I had to purchase 5 kits that had 4 buttons.  Each one was $1.97.  I made all my buttons while watching t.v. with the Hubs.  Here is a tip:  if you are using the Wal-Mart buttons, follow the instructions for covering but put a dab of hot glue in the button before you put the back on.  Then use the tools to get it started but I use two screw drivers (one in each hand) to finish it off.  Just press all the way around.  It dents the back of the button but who cares, its sturdy and it wont be seen.  I have done this on both the headboard  in my master and guest bedroom and pulled my hardest to tuft them.  Two years later…they are still intact.

13.)  Next, I laid the fabric over the foam covered top and tufted the ottoman.  I wanted the buttons to sink in a little so I decided to attach the buttons BEFORE I stapled the fabric to the bottom.  I used fishing twine to attach the buttons and an upholstery needle I had.  An upholstery needle is key because its larger and sturdier.  Since I had made holes in the wood and the foam, it makes navigating the needle easier but sometimes it takes patience.  My trick:  use a wooden kabob skewer to help know where the needle goes.

14.)  After making 5-6 loops through each button  I tied it off.  To tie it off I use scrap fabric and made little rolls.  I tied the extra string around it and knotted it.  Then, I wrapped the extra string around it and stapled the fabric down.  The bulk of it goes in the hole but if its thick enough it gets stuck and holds.  Hopefully you can see better by the picture.  Stapling the fabric down helps me make the button be taught and it also flattens the fabric for the next step.

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15.)  I stapled the fabric around the edges of the underside.  (see pic above)

16.)  Now its time to cover the ugly.  I used some leftover fabric from my guest bedroom headboard to cover the bottom.  I just laid it on there and stapled it, folding the edges under on each side.

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17.) I took the legs off the Lack table and cut about four inches off the bottom.  I wanted to leave the top of the legs so I could use the hardware to attach the legs.

18.)  I attached the existing hardware to my new ottoman top.  To do so I had to:

  • Mark where the hardware would go
  • Cut away the fabric
  • Drill a pilot hole in the middle so the threaded screw could go all the way into the hardware and ottoman top easily.  (The Lack leg hardware actually is made to fit in a hole pre-made by Ikea. They do this to make the leg and top look seamless.  I thought about drilling a hole out of the underside of the ottoman to make it work exactly but I realized that the edge I made with the 1X2 hid the fact that the metal mounting hardware was shown at the top of the leg so I didn’t worry about it.  This pic shows my attempt to make the hole before I realized I didn’t need to or have a drill bit wide enough.  The hardware just rest right on top of the wood.  Notice the hole in the middle for the threaded screw to go beyond the hardware.

19.)  The last thing I did was screw in the existing hardware and screw on the legs

and that is how I got it to this stage:

Now, I am still working on part two.  I need a bottom shelf for magazines and storage.  I strategically cut the Lack legs so I could keep the metal things that the old shelf rested on.  Now, I just need to cut some wood and paint a lower shelf.  I will update you when I do that.  I am also thinking about putting casters on the bottom.

I have finished, check out the finished product here!

Thanks for reading,

Jennifer

If you liked this post you might like these:

Clamp Bedside Lights

DIY Bed Slats

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First of all, thanks for all your comments and emails from Wednesday’s post.  I feel so blessed to have a roof over my head.  It has been a crazy couple of days here in my hometown, but we are starting to put it all back together.  Tourist season starts in a couple of weeks and they are moving and bustling to get the town ready whether it be fixing the damage or finding temporary locations to do business.  Most importantly, its been fun to see our little community help the people whose homes were severely damaged.  Friends and community members opened their homes, and hotels opened their rooms. For the most part, power is restored. I went back to work and the internet is faster than 20 minutes to upload a picture. (It took me FOREVER to load those pictures on Wednesday)

My best friend Ashley and her family were without power so we got to have her family over for some pizza.  Hanging out with friends was fun too!

Okay, onto normal posting.  I have been slowly rehabbing my living room. I got side tracked by a few projects like my bicycles but I am committed to finishing this room out.   I have done a few projects before this year like building a bench and finding furniture, but the action didn’t start happening until I finally convinced The hubs that our fireplace need to be painted white.  (I didn’t have to twist his arm.  I was just patient and he saw my vision) The the DIY just unfolded:

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I am close to finishing this room but there are a few odds and ends such as:

  • New coffee table  (I have the Ikea Lack coffee table that cost me $19.00.  It serves its purpose well but its a little out of proportion.
  • Jazz up my side table
  • New lamp for side table
  • New shade for lamp
  • Maybe jazz up the existing shades in my living room.
  • Sew some more pillows
  • Hang something over the mantle (not sure what but I am thinking of DIYing this)
  • Add a little more artwork
  • Find a side table for my chair
  • Spice up the back of my roman shades.  Why?  Well, I lined them myself and while it doesn’t look bad, it looks like any liner, I have decided that I don’t like the look from the front of my house.  We are going to be working on curb appeal this spring so this project is not really for my living room but for curb appeal.

Hows that for a list?  Come back on Monday and I will show you how I turned my plain jane Lack coffee table from this:

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To this:

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This picture isn’t the finished product.  I have to add a base.

See ya monday,

Jennifer

If you liked this post you might like these:

Master Bath Rehab

Guest Bedroom Rehab

Bedsheets to Curtains

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